Research website of Dr Gilbert Price

Live from the dig- Day 3

Our final day in the field kicked off with the same great weather that had made the past couple of days… [more]

Live from the dig- Day 3 Live from the dig- Day 3

Live from the dig- Day 2

WOW!!! What an awesome day! It started so well. We woke at dawn to some absolutely spectacular weather.… [more]

Live from the dig- Day 2 Live from the dig- Day 2

Live from the dig- Day 1

The best times that you can hope for at work are those days when you don’t have to actually go to work!… [more]

Live from the dig- Day 1 Live from the dig- Day 1

Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna

People often ask me what is involved in my fieldwork. It’s always pretty fun to describe the kinds… [more]

Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna

Tall Poppy Awards

One of the things that I really enjoy about my work is telling people about it! I mean, who doesn’t… [more]

Tall Poppy Awards Tall Poppy Awards

Featured Posts

Live from the dig- Day 3

Live from the dig- Day 3

Our final day in the field kicked off with the same great weather that had made the past couple of days so wonderful. It’s just such a good time for field work. We only had a short day in front of us as we had to get back to Brisbane by the late afternoon, so we all got up and made our way down to the fossil site bright and early. Our first task of the day was to plaster jacket some of the larger specimens that the team had partially excavated on Day 2. The fossils included a wonderful … [Read More...]

Live from the dig: Day 2

Live from the dig- Day 2

WOW!!! What an awesome day! It started so well. We woke at dawn to some absolutely spectacular weather. The temperature was perfect for digging, and a faint, but crisp, breeze was gently blowing. As it turned out, it was a pretty good omen. We got to the dig site early and continued on from our work the previous day. Kyle excavated an enormous kangaroo femur that he had found yesterday. Nick stumbled across the lower jaw of a giant wombat-like marsupial, Euryzygoma. It had no teeth, but … [Read More...]

Lungfish tooth plate

Live from the dig- Day 1

The best times that you can hope for at work are those days when you don’t have to actually go to work! And that’s what happened to me today. Only a few weeks in the planning, my crew and I left this morning for a fossil dig at an awesome Pliocene (3.5 million year old) fossil site near Chinchilla on the Darling Downs, around three hours drive west of Brisbane. Our goal of the trip: to have a scout around the area, keeping an eye out for fossils of the ancestors of our modern vertebrate … [Read More...]

Fieldwork in caves

Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna

People often ask me what is involved in my fieldwork. It’s always pretty fun to describe the kinds of places that I get to go and to reflect on the type of work that I do. From working along crocodile-infested rivers in search of fossils eroding out of ancient creek banks, to checking out old excavated dams in the backs of farmer’s paddocks, fieldwork is pretty amazing and there’s nothing else quite like it. One of the things that people seem to get a bit squeamish about, is the caving side … [Read More...]

Tall Poppy Awards

Tall Poppy Awards

One of the things that I really enjoy about my work is telling people about it! I mean, who doesn’t love a good yarn about an Ice Age cold case featuring some of the coolest, biggest and meanest beasts that ever walked the planet! It’s an easy sell too- most people know a little about dinosaurs, but when you tell them that there were giant wombats, massive kangaroos, and marsupial lions living alongside Australia’s earliest peoples… well, their jaws just drop! I was recently invited to attend … [Read More...]

Euryzygoma premaxilla fossil from Chinchilla showing three incisor teeth

Keeping your hands clean in the field

The life of a palaeontologist isn’t all that glamorous. Most of my time is spent in the office in front of a computer writing reports and grant proposals. One of the things that I really look forward to is getting out in the field and getting my hands dirty. There is nothing quite like being outside in the fresh air and digging up fossils. I recently ventured out to Chinchilla, southeast Queensland, in search of Pliocene megafauna. I’ve written previously about Chinchilla’s fossil record; in … [Read More...]

Ice Age Queensland

Ice Age Queensland

In late 2011, I was invited to write a chapter for an upcoming book on the Quaternary geology of Queensland. Not being a geologist, I was initially hesitant to take on the job. I thought about it for a bit though- I work in the Quaternary (i.e, the last 2.6 million years of Earth’s history) and in Queensland, so I eventually thought to myself, “why not?!” It turns out that it was one of the most challenging things that I have ever done, but also one of the best moves that I could have … [Read More...]

The Diprotodon skull nearly finished (photo: I. Sobbe)

Diprotodon’s big day out

I recently wrote about a giant Dipotodon skull that was discovered fossilised in Pleistocene-aged deposits on the Darling Downs. It is a monstrous skull, measuring around 90 cm in length, and discovered by a local simply walking along the creek. With the help of the discoverer, we excavated the skull, then my friend, Ian Sobbe, a local farmer and amateur palaeontologist, set to work preparing the skull. Ian spent the best part of a year working on the specimen. Simply put, Ian did a cracking … [Read More...]

The Diprotodon is over 90cm long!

Digging up Diprotodon

It was around August 2011 that my friend, Ian Sobbe, received a phone call from a local on the Darling Downs: “I’ve found a skull in the dirt- it looks like a Grand Angus bull”, the caller said. Well, Ian, being not only a local farmer from the Downs but also an amateur fossil collector, started to get excited. Knowing a lot about the fossils from the region, Ian checked out the photos that the local had emailed him and immediately called me up. The skull was not a Grand Angus at all, but as Ian … [Read More...]