Research website of Dr Gilbert Price

Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna

People often ask me what is involved in my fieldwork. It’s always pretty fun to describe the kinds… [more]

Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna

Tall Poppy Awards

One of the things that I really enjoy about my work is telling people about it! I mean, who doesn’t… [more]

Tall Poppy Awards Tall Poppy Awards

Keeping your hands clean in the field

The life of a palaeontologist isn’t all that glamorous. Most of my time is spent in the office in front… [more]

Keeping your hands clean in the field Keeping your hands clean in the field

Ice Age Queensland

In late 2011, I was invited to write a chapter for an upcoming book on the Quaternary geology of Queensland.… [more]

Ice Age Queensland Ice Age Queensland

Diprotodon’s big day out

I recently wrote about a giant Dipotodon skull that was discovered fossilised in Pleistocene-aged deposits… [more]

Diprotodon’s big day out Diprotodon's big day out

Featured Posts

Fieldwork in caves

Getting down underground in search of Ice Age megafauna

People often ask me what is involved in my fieldwork. It’s always pretty fun to describe the kinds of places that I get to go and to reflect on the type of work that I do. From working along crocodile-infested rivers in search of fossils eroding out of ancient creek banks, to checking out old excavated dams in the backs of farmer’s paddocks, fieldwork is pretty amazing and there’s nothing else quite like it. One of the things that people seem to get a bit squeamish about, is the caving side … [Read More...]

Tall Poppy Awards

Tall Poppy Awards

One of the things that I really enjoy about my work is telling people about it! I mean, who doesn’t love a good yarn about an Ice Age cold case featuring some of the coolest, biggest and meanest beasts that ever walked the planet! It’s an easy sell too- most people know a little about dinosaurs, but when you tell them that there were giant wombats, massive kangaroos, and marsupial lions living alongside Australia’s earliest peoples… well, their jaws just drop! I was recently invited to attend … [Read More...]

Euryzygoma premaxilla fossil from Chinchilla showing three incisor teeth

Keeping your hands clean in the field

The life of a palaeontologist isn’t all that glamorous. Most of my time is spent in the office in front of a computer writing reports and grant proposals. One of the things that I really look forward to is getting out in the field and getting my hands dirty. There is nothing quite like being outside in the fresh air and digging up fossils. I recently ventured out to Chinchilla, southeast Queensland, in search of Pliocene megafauna. I’ve written previously about Chinchilla’s fossil record; in … [Read More...]

Ice Age Queensland

Ice Age Queensland

In late 2011, I was invited to write a chapter for an upcoming book on the Quaternary geology of Queensland. Not being a geologist, I was initially hesitant to take on the job. I thought about it for a bit though- I work in the Quaternary (i.e, the last 2.6 million years of Earth’s history) and in Queensland, so I eventually thought to myself, “why not?!” It turns out that it was one of the most challenging things that I have ever done, but also one of the best moves that I could have … [Read More...]

The Diprotodon skull nearly finished (photo: I. Sobbe)

Diprotodon’s big day out

I recently wrote about a giant Dipotodon skull that was discovered fossilised in Pleistocene-aged deposits on the Darling Downs. It is a monstrous skull, measuring around 90 cm in length, and discovered by a local simply walking along the creek. With the help of the discoverer, we excavated the skull, then my friend, Ian Sobbe, a local farmer and amateur palaeontologist, set to work preparing the skull. Ian spent the best part of a year working on the specimen. Simply put, Ian did a cracking … [Read More...]

The Diprotodon is over 90cm long!

Digging up Diprotodon

It was around August 2011 that my friend, Ian Sobbe, received a phone call from a local on the Darling Downs: “I’ve found a skull in the dirt- it looks like a Grand Angus bull”, the caller said. Well, Ian, being not only a local farmer from the Downs but also an amateur fossil collector, started to get excited. Knowing a lot about the fossils from the region, Ian checked out the photos that the local had emailed him and immediately called me up. The skull was not a Grand Angus at all, but as Ian … [Read More...]

Undergraduate student volunteer Nick Wiggins (UQ) excavating at Colosseum Chamber

Excavating the owl’s dinner plate

Recently I wrote about an ongoing study at Colosseum Chamber, an extensive fossil deposit located at the Capricorn Caves tourist park, just north of Rockhampton in central eastern Queensland. The chamber occurs within an ancient cavernous limestone, which itself dates back to the Devonian (over 350 million years ago). The Colosseum deposit is around 2 m deep and, to put it simply, is chockfull of the fossilised remains of an ancient feast. The bones are the leftovers – the undigested parts – … [Read More...]

Dr Julien Louys at the Colosseum Chamber excavation

Sifting through 80 thousand years of owl spew

This definitely isn’t the most glamorous title that I’ve ever come up with, but it’s certainly one of the most accurate! Situated at the Capricorn Caves tourist park, about 20 minutes north of Rockhampton in central eastern Queensland, lies one of the most important Quaternary-aged cave fossil deposits in Australia. The deposit, situated in Colosseum Chamber, is 2 m deep and contains numerous bones of small-bodied vertebrates such as rodents, dunnarts, antechinuses, bats, frogs and quails. By … [Read More...]

Dr Julien Louys collecting dating samples

Fieldwork at Chinchilla

An incredible Pliocene vertebrate fossil site occurs at Chinchilla, about four hours drive west of Brisbane, Australia. Fossils have been known from the area since the 1800’s with numerous species identified to date. The fossil fauna includes animals as diverse as diprotodontoids (the same family of mega-marsupials as Diprotodon), short- and long-faced kangaroos, wombats, koalas, and lizards. Despite the richness of the assemblage, plus fact that Chinchilla represents one of few fossil deposits … [Read More...]