Research website of Dr Gilbert Price

Archives for November 8, 2012

Diprotodon’s big day out

The early stages of preparing the Diprotodon skull (photo: I. Sobbe)

The early stages of preparing the Diprotodon skull (photo: I. Sobbe)

I recently wrote about a giant Diprotodon skull that was discovered fossilised in Pleistocene-aged deposits on the Darling Downs. It is a monstrous skull, measuring around 90 cm in length, and discovered by a local simply walking along the creek. With the help of the discoverer, we excavated the skull, then my friend, Ian Sobbe, a local farmer and amateur palaeontologist, set to work preparing the skull.

Ian spent the best part of a year working on the specimen. Simply put, Ian did a cracking job. It’s a wonderfully preserved skull with exquisite detail. Ian used a combination of brushes, dental picks, scrapers, glues and other consolidants to remove the surrounding sediments and ensure that the skull wouldn’t crack and break as it dried out.

The Diprotodon skull nearly finished (photo: I. Sobbe)

The Diprotodon skull nearly finished (photo: I. Sobbe)

With the original discoverer’s blessing, the skull was donated to the Queensland Museum in September 2012. By having the skull in an institution like the Queensland Museum, it ensures that the specimen will be well-looked after and stored in the most appropriate conditions (temperature and humidity controlled storage and so on) to ensure its long-term preservation. The skull will most likely also go on display to the public sometime in the next year or so.

Ian and I have some big plans for the skull. We’d like to eventually write-up a description of the specimen and have it published in a peer-reviewed science journal. We are also working with a PhD student from Monash University, Alana Sharp, who is conducting a study on the nasals of the big guy.

Ian Sobbe and the Diprotodon

Ian Sobbe and the Diprotodon

I have also drilled tiny tooth samples from the skull that will allow me to directly date it using uranium-series methods (currently in preparation). I already have some radiocarbon dates for the skull, and hopefully soon, some optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates by my colleague, Dr Kathryn Fitzsimmons (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, in Germany). If we can get some really good results- dating, anatomy and biology, it’ll be just so important for learning more about how Diprotodon lived and died.